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State Summaries

FINANCE

Alabama

The governing board of each four-year public college or university determines resident tuition rates. Each institution charges nonresident undergraduate students a minimum of two times the resident tuition rate. In determining residency, the primary issue is one of intent. If a person is in Alabama primarily for the purpose of obtaining an education, that person shall be considered a nonresident student. The board of trustees may establish matriculation, library and laboratory facilities fees. The State Board of Education is the governing board for the state community, junior, and technical colleges and establishes in-state tuition rates. The out-of-state tuition for these institutions also is two times that of the in-state tuition rate. Students who have graduated from an Alabama high school, who have obtained a GED in Alabama within two years of the date of their application for admission, or who live within 50 miles of a campus of an Alabama College System institution, are granted in-state tuition. Board policy establishes student fee structures for the two-year institutions. Alabama offers tuition assistance to full-time employees of community, junior, and technical colleges and their dependents (courses taught by Athens State College are not subject to this policy) as well as dependent children and spouses of full-time law enforcement officers or firefighters who have been killed in the line of duty. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Alaska

Alaska's philosophy is, "Recognizing that state general fund support is not sufficient to pay the full cost of education and that students have a responsibility to contribute to the cost of their higher education, tuition and student fees will be established to the extent practicable in accordance with the following objectives: (1) to provide for essential support to the university's instructional programs; (2) to make higher education accessible to Alaskans who have the interest, dedication, and ability to learn; and (3) to maintain tuition and student fees at levels which are competitive with similarly situated programs of other western states." The Board of Regents establishes resident and nonresident tuition rates. Annual tuition is adjusted for inflation based on a moving average of inflation for the most recent three-year period. Residency is based on intent and two years of physical presence in the state. Nonresident students pay a nonresident tuition surcharge plus regular tuition. The university president establishes and approves fees, which must have a direct relationship to the service, activity, or course and be based on the estimated cost of providing the service or benefit. The president also may grant tuition waivers. Other waivers are provided to residents 60 years of age and older, and eligible dependent children or spouses of peace officers, firefighters, or members of the armed services listed as missing-in-action, prisoner-of-war, or killed in the line of duty. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Arizona

The Board of Regents establishes resident and non-resident tuition, summer session fees, base fees for continuing education courses, and other fees charged by the institutions. The minimum tuition rate may not be an amount less than that prescribed by the Legislature. The Board's decision on tuition and fee rates is based on five factors - a report on the average state expenditure authority per full-time equivalent student (SEAPS), a report on financial aid availability, other student fees and charges at each university, revenues required to service bonded indebtedness, and a report on the price of attendance at each university calculated using a common framework consistent with federal guidelines. Total mandatory undergraduate resident student tuition and fees cannot exceed the top of the lower one-third of rates set by all other states (34th position). According to statute, community colleges are governed by the State Board of Directors for Community Colleges. In 2002, however, the Legislature did not appropriate funds to the board, and therefore, it has become defunct. Each community college district now sets tuition and fees. Although Arizona does not have a substantial state financial aid program, it offers tuition waivers to children and spouses of peace officers and emergency paramedics who have been killed in the line of duty. The state also administers the Qualified Tuition Reduction Program. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Arkansas

The tuition rate for each four-year institution is determined by the board of trustees. This board fixes a scale of matriculation and tuition fees, in reasonable sums. A student should be classified as an in-state resident for tuition purposes only if his or her legal residence is located in Arkansas and intends to make Arkansas his or her permanent home. Arkansas' intent is to make technical and community college programs available to as many citizens as possible, and as a result, tuition and fees are to be maintained at a reasonable level so as not to exclude citizens because of cost. The local board determines the minimum in-district and out-of-district student tuition and fees for these institutions. Students residing outside a community college district may be subject to extra tuition and fees. Arkansas provides tuition waivers to individuals 60 years of age and older and World War I veterans, as well as dependents of disabled veterans, prisoners of war, or disabled police officers. The Arkansas National Guard Scholarship program has been repealed; however, up to twenty-five percent of tuition costs may be waived by the institution for Arkansas National Guard soldiers and airmen. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

California

California's higher education institutions do not charge tuition, but fees. At the four-year institutions, the Educational Fee is a university-wide mandatory charge assessed against each resident and nonresident student and is assessed uniformly across all university campuses. Income generated from this fee funds programs and services such as financial aid, admissions, registration, administration, and libraries, and also supports the university's operating budget. The president of each campus recommends the annual Educational Fee level to the board. The University Registration Fee also is a university-wide mandatory charge assessed against each resident and nonresident student, but it is not assessed uniformly across all campuses. Income generated from this fee may be used to support services which benefit the student and are complementary to the instructional program. The Board of Regents establishes a range within which campuses are to set a specific fee level, and after soliciting student views, the chancellor submits to the president the recommended fee level for final review and approval. The governing board of each community college district charges a fee per unit per semester. Tuition waivers exist for residents 60 years of age or older, eligible employees of California postsecondary institutions, veterans and dependants of military personnel, and spouses and dependants of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty or of individuals killed in the Sept 11 attacks. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Colorado

The governing boards of Colorado's public institutions of higher education establish tuition rates based on legislatively set limits on tuition increases and other legislative directions. In addition, governing boards must also comply with the Colorado Commission on Higher Education's tuition policy, which states that resident tuition rates should cover between 25 and 35 percent of total education costs for the academic program, while non-resident tuition rates should cover at least 100 percent. These guidelines do not apply to the Colorado School of Mines. Resident and non-resident students pay the same amount in mandatory student fees. The governing board must approve any increase or decrease to a student fee. All governing boards shall annually review and approve all mandatory fees. All institutions must give at least thirty days notice before any fee assessment or increase. New student fees must be first approved by students through a referendum and then by the governing board. At four-year institutions, the administration of each institution and the student government establish the fee policy. At community colleges, the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education meet with the Student Advisory Council to establish the fee policy. At the Auraria Campus, the administration of the Auraria Higher Education Center and the Student Advisory Council to the Auraria Board (SACAB) establish the fee policy. Fees should not be substituted for tuition and may not be used to provide general revenue to the college. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Connecticut

The Board of Governors of Higher Education reviews and recommends changes in tuition and fees at the constituent units (institutions) of the state system of higher education, but ultimately the constituent units have a great deal of autonomy. Legislative intent is that the constituent units apply uniform rules in determining whether students shall be classified as in-state or out-of-state students for tuition purposes. The Board of Trustees of the Community-Technical Colleges determines and adopts tuition and fees schedules at the regional community-technical colleges, and may make refunds to the same. The Board of Governors waives tuition for dependent children of those declared missing in action, killed in the line of duty, or prisoner of war; veterans who served in specific wars; students enrolled in the Connecticut Police Academy; active members of the Connecticut Army or Air National Guard; and seniors over 62 years of age. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Delaware

The Boards of Trustees of the University of Delaware, Delaware State University, and Delaware Technical and Community College set tuition annually in Delaware. Citizens who are 60 years of age and older may attend any of these institutions without paying tuition and fees. In addition, active members of the Delaware National Guard are eligible for funding support for certain postsecondary education tuition charges and fees if they meet certain criteria. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Florida

Undergraduate tuition rates are established annually in the General Appropriations Act. The president of each public four-year institution recommends to their board of trustees a schedule of tuition and fees to be charged by the university within the law and rules of the State Board of Education. The board of trustees then approves these rates and submits them to the Board of Governors for approval. The Board of Governors establishes tuition for graduate and professional programs, and out-of-state fees for all programs. The sum of tuition and out-of-state fees assessed to non-resident students must be sufficient to offset the full instructional cost of serving such students. Upon recommendation from the president, each community college board of trustees establishes tuition and out-of-state fees, which may vary no more than 10 percent below and 15 percent above the combined total of the fee schedule adopted by the State Board of Education and the technology fee adopted by a board of trustees. Tuition and fee waivers vary by institution. For example, community colleges may waive fees for any fee-nonexempt student, a state university may waive any or all fees for persons who supervise interns for the university, and a state university may waive application, tuition, and related fees for persons 60 years of age and older. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Georgia

The Board of Regents annually approves tuition and fee rates for all University System of Georgia institutions and programs. Georgia's Guaranteed Tuition Plan ensures fixed tuition rates for new students for three to four years, depending on the enrolling program. An institution may waive out-of-state tuition and assess in-state tuition for students participating in the Academic Common Market, International and Superior Out-of-State students, university system employees, their spouses, and dependents, and others eligible individuals. An institution may waive mandatory fees, excluding technology fees, for students who reside or study at another institution, students enrolled in practicum experiences or internships located at least 50 miles from the institution, students enrolled in distance learning programs, or students enrolled at off-campus centers. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Hawaii

Hawaii's basic tuition philosophy is, "Every qualified Hawaii citizen shall have an opportunity to pursue postsecondary education within the University system. Since tuition and fees are critical to access, they shall not be so uniformly high that they prevent qualified citizens from attending a campus of the University. As a general principle, the Board subscribes to a tuition policy that seeks to keep costs to resident students at the lowest practical level while maintaining a financial aid program that responds to the needs of students who cannot meet the costs of attendance." The Board of Regents establishes resident and nonresident tuition fees for regular courses of instruction at all University of Hawaii campuses, including the community colleges. The board also may charge other fees for special programs of instruction, laboratory fees, course fees, fees for student activities, and an information technology user fee. A five-year tuition and fees schedule was established in 2001-02 by the Board of Regents in order to make costs predictable for students. Modest increases (approximately 3 percent) were built into that schedule. The Board of Regents grants, modifies, and suspends tuition waivers, which are intended to support equal access by Hawaii residents, promote the achievement of high quality educational programs, and foster the development and maintenance of a highly diversified and stimulating campus environment. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Idaho

The State Board of Education may prescribe fees, including tuition, defined as the fee charged for any and all educational costs, for resident and nonresident students enrolled in all state colleges and universities other than the University of Idaho. The University of Idaho may charge matriculation fees to residents; however, tuition, defined as the fee charged for the cost of instruction at the colleges and universities, may only be charged to nonresident, full-time and part-time students enrolled in any degree-granting program and to professional-technical education students enrolled in pre-employment, preparatory programs. The Board of Regents for the University of Idaho sets tuition rates for nonresident students and matriculation fees for resident students. In each community college, the board of trustees sets community college tuition and various fees by August 1 each year. The tuition for resident, full-time students cannot be less than 350 per year, and may only be increased by increments of up to 10 percent to a maximum tuition of 1,250 per year. Community college tuition for non-resident students is set at a level that covers the annual costs of all elements of providing the courses of instruction. The State Board of Education and the board of regents of the University of Idaho may determine when to grant a full or partial waiver of fees or tuition charged to nonresident students pursuant to reciprocal agreements with other states. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Illinois

The presidents of the four-year institutions recommend resident and nonresident tuition levels to the boards of trustees for approval. Students are considered residents if they have graduated from an Illinois high school and/or have lived in Illinois for 3 years prior to matriculation. Each year, public universities must include as part of an undergraduate student's tuition bill the statement, "For Fiscal Year ___ the General Assembly and the Governor authorized the aggregate amount of ___ to be appropriated from the General Revenue Fund and the Education Assistance Fund for operation of the State's public universities. For Fiscal Year ___ each resident undergraduate full-time public university student received an average tuition subsidy of ___ from the State of Illinois, which was applied to offset the full cost of instruction." Community college districts, by resolution of the boards, set tuition at two-year institutions. The state offers partial tuition waivers to eligible children of employees of public institutions, and full tuition waivers to eligible members of the Illinois National Guard and dependent children and spouses of law enforcement officers, fire fighters and other qualified state personnel killed in the line of duty. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Indiana

The board of trustees of each state educational institution (four-year and community colleges) set resident and non-resident fees, tuition, and charges in two-year periods as "necessary or convenient to further the purposes of that institution." Students are considered residents if they have graduated from an Indiana high school, have lived in Indiana for 4 years prior to their matriculation, or have parents who have lived in Indiana for 3 years prior to their matriculation. Management, operation, and financing of all state education institutions are under the authority of the trustees or other governing bodies of these institutions. The state provides tuition waivers to veterans, dependent children of eligible members of the armed forces, dependent children and spouses of law enforcement officers, fire fighters and other qualified emergency personnel killed in the line of duty, citizens who are at least sixty years of age, and double up students. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Iowa

The Board of Regents is responsible for establishing resident and nonresident fees and student charges at the Regent institutions. Each proposed increase in student charges is presented to the Board twice by university presidents - first for preliminary consideration and public notice requirements, and second for final approval. The Board must adopt a policy for establishing tuition that provides some predictability for assessing and anticipating changes. Resident undergraduate tuition is set annually to keep pace with the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI). At the community colleges, each board of directors has the authority to determine tuition rates. Full-time resident students enrolled at an accredited private institution and who establish financial need may be awarded tuition grants for not more than eight semesters of undergraduate study or the trimester or quarter equivalent. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Kansas

The Kansas Board of Regents fixes tuition, enrollment fees, student housing fees, building construction fees, and changes in academic fees. The Board delegates to the chief executive officer of each institution the authority to establish user and administrative fees where the increase does not generate an amount in excess of 250,000 annually. The board of trustees at each community college charges and collects tuition at rates per credit hour enrolled. The board of trustees also determines the amount of out-district tuition to be charged for each out-district student attending community colleges. To be considered a resident, the student or the student's parents must have resided in the district for at least six months prior to enrollment. Tuition waivers are available for members of the Kansas National Guard, and for eligible dependents of prisoners of war, those listed as missing in action, and state officials killed in the line of duty. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Kentucky

The Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE) has statutory responsibility to determine resident and nonresident tuition rates for students enrolling in Kentucky's public postsecondary institutions. By statute, the state's tuition policy must be responsive to rates charged at benchmark institutions in neighboring states and consider the need for economic access to higher education for Kentucky residents. Undergraduate nonresident students must be charged tuition and fees that are at least 1.75 times higher than resident tuition and fees. The CPE classifies a student as having Kentucky residency if the student met the residency requirements at the beginning of his or her last year in high school and enters a Kentucky postsecondary education institution within two years of high school graduation. In an effort to provide increased management flexibility, the CPE delegates authority to set tuition to the individual governing boards of the state's public universities and the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, with the understanding that the rates established adhere to a set of guidelines approved by the Council. Tuition waivers are available for employees of public postsecondary institutions, citizens who are 65 years of age or older, National Guard members, veterans and their families, dependents of police officers and firefighters killed in the line of duty or of military personnel classified as prisoners of war or missing in action. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Louisiana

The Louisiana Board of Regents delegates authority to the individual Boards of Supervisors of the Southern University System, the Louisiana State University System, the University of Louisiana System, and the Louisiana Community and Technical College System to establish resident and nonresident tuition and fee rates, in accordance with the tuition and fee policies set by the Board of Regents. The boards of each institution may also impose a technology fee to defray the cost of instructional technology, and an academic excellence fee to promote academic excellence at each institution by enhancing instructional programs. The boards may grant fee waivers to persons over fifty-five years of age, National Guard members, dependents of police officers, firefighters, and military personnel killed in the line of duty or listed as prisoners of war or missing in action, and children of school employees. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Maine

The Board of Trustees of the University of Maine System establishes tuition rates for system institutions by credit hour. Rates are set for in-state and out-of-state undergraduate, graduate, and law students. Nonresident tuition is set at a rate between 2.4 and 2.8 times the resident rate. The Board of Trustees establishes fees that must be paid by all students as a condition of attendance and student activity fees. At individual institutions, the Chancellor sets fees impacting services and operations within the System, and the President sets course fees, deposits, general fees, and fees for optional University services and activities. The Board of Trustees of the Maine Technical College System Office establishes and collects room and board fees and tuition for the two-year colleges. The Boards of Trustees have established several different tuition and fee waiver programs. Typically, waivers are similar to entitlement programs. If a student meets certain criteria, that student is not required to pay all of the University tuition, and in some cases, fees. Dependent children and spouses of firefighters, law enforcement officers, and emergency medical services personnel killed in the line of duty may attend any state postsecondary institution free of tuition charges. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Maryland

Needs Data

Massachussetts

The Board of Trustees may fix the amount of tuition and fees at any of the state colleges and at the Massachusetts College of Art. Tuition, however, cannot be set at less than 100. Tuition and fees charged to veterans are not included in this minimum requirement. The board also may fix the amount of student activity fees at any of the state colleges, the Massachusetts College of Art, and the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Tuition is waived for National Guard members. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Michigan

The Board of Regents of the University of Michigan determines the level of resident and nonresident student fees, and it publishes a schedule of such fees. All other student fees are fixed by the Committee on Budget Administration. The boards of trustees of the community colleges establish and collect tuition and fees for resident and nonresident students. The board may waive tuition in certain instances and enter into reciprocity agreements for an exchange of educational services. The state provides tuition waivers to citizens over 60 years of age, veterans and their dependents, dependents of police officers, fire fighters, and corrections officers killed in the line of duty, and North American Indians. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Minnesota

The president of the University of Minnesota recommends tuition and fee rates to the Board of Regents in the Annual Operating Budget for their approval. The Board of Trustees for the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (which includes the state's community colleges) establishes tuition for system institutions and prescribes fees for student unions, state college and university activities, functions, and purposes. Fee statements at all campuses indicate the state-paid portion of the cost of an average student's education in that system by including the statement, "Tuition pays for approximately ____ % of the cost of a student at a public college. The state of Minnesota pays approximately ____ of the average cost for full-time students." Minnesota grants free tuition to any state resident who is over 62 years of age or who has graduated from the state academy for the blind upon compliance with all other requirements. The president of a state university, community college, or technical college may waive the fee assessed to a student applying for admission, if the president determines that the fee would impose an economic hardship on the student or the student's family. Tuition waivers may also be granted selectively to accommodate state law, attract students, offer university education as a benefit to employees, promote cooperation with other higher education institutions, support international exchange of students, and serve humanitarian purposes. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Mississippi

The goal of the Board of Trustees of the Institutions of Higher Learning is to provide high quality programs at the institutions that are affordable, accessible, and accountable. The Board's general policy is that "tuition, fees and other student charges should be kept as low as possible consistent with the need to provide sufficient revenues to insure the provision of high quality programs." The Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning and the boards of trustees of the community colleges and junior colleges are authorized to prescribe the amount of tuition and fees to be paid by resident and non-resident students attending the several state-supported institutions of higher learning and community colleges and junior colleges of the State of Mississippi. Residency is determined by 4 years of attendance at, and graduation from, a Mississippi high school. Each institution may also establish or waive participation/optional fees, but an annual report of these fees must be presented to the Board. The Board may waive tuition for students meeting certain eligibility criteria, defined by high school curriculum and financial need. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Missouri

The Missouri Department of Higher Education (MDHE) is the administrative arm of the Coordinating Board for Higher Education (CBHE). As a coordinating board, the CBHE does not have the authority to set tuition and fees for Missouri public two- and four-year institutions. Each institution's governing board, board of trustees, board of curators, etc., sets the tuition and fee levels for its institution. Institutions make the determination if a student is a resident or a non-resident for tuition and fee purposes based on evidence provided by the student. Missouri residents who are at least 65 years old on or before August 1 of the school year, and who are otherwise eligible, may receive scholarships to a state institution. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Montana

The Board of Regents prescribes resident and non-resident tuition and fee rates for institutions under its jurisdiction, though campuses have the flexibility to differentiate tuition by program, sector and method of delivery to reflect the cost of providing education. Non-resident tuition rates must be at least 150 percent of resident tuition rates. Approval of a schedule of tuition and fees occurs every other year. The board of trustees of each community college district, upon approval of the Board of Regents, prescribes tuition and fee rates. The regents may waive tuition and fees for eligible individuals who are 62 years of age or older, university system employees, one-fourth Indian descent, and those who served in the armed forces, are qualified survivors of firefighters or peace officers killed in the line of duty, or are children or spouses of those who served in the military and are declared missing-in-action or were killed in action. The individual campuses of the Montana University System also may waive fees in accordance with board policy. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Nebraska

All state institutions are authorized to fix their own tuition and other fees. The governing board of each institution sets and collects resident and non-resident tuition and fees, and determines conditions for residency at their institution. The community college boards establish resident and non-resident tuition rates for courses of instruction offered by each community college within its community college area. Each institution may establish rules for waiving or refunding fees to students maintaining high scholarship or to those who maintain satisfactory scholarship and are in need of financial assistance. The University of Nebraska, the state colleges, and the community colleges waive all tuition for dependents of veterans who died or were permanently disabled in the line of duty, or were declared missing in action or a prisoner of war. Members of the Nebraska National Guard receive a credit of 75 percent of the resident tuition charges of any state public postsecondary institution he or she attends. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Nevada

Needs Data

New Hampshire

The Board of Trustees of the University System of New Hampshire approves an annual budget for system institutions, including associated tuition rates and mandatory student fees. The Board of Trustees of the Community College System of New Hampshire sets tuition and fee rates and policies for institutions in that system. The trustees of the university system grant free tuition to indigent students so far as practicable. Members of the New Hampshire National Guard who are otherwise eligible out-of-state residents but cannot qualify for free tuition due to unavailability of space may pay the in-state tuition rate. At all New Hampshire public postsecondary institutions, dependents of those serving in the armed forces who are listed as missing in action or other specific classifications are granted free tuition, as well as students between the ages of 16 and 26 who are orphans of veterans who died as the result of a service-related disability. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

New Jersey

The New Jersey Commission on Higher Education provides coordination, planning, policy development, and advocacy for the state's higher education system with advice from the New Jersey Presidents' Council, which is comprised of the presidents (who serve ex officio) of public and private institutions of higher education. However, neither the Commission nor the Presidents' Council has the power to set tuition and fees. Instead, the governing body (Board of Trustees) of each institution of higher education, including the community colleges, establishes its own resident and non-resident tuition and fee levels. Non-resident tuition and fee rates must be higher than resident rates. According to state law, any eligible member of the New Jersey National Guard is permitted to attend any public institution in the state and receive up to 15 credits per semester tuition-free. In addition, New Jersey institutions may allow persons who are 65 years of age and older to enroll without the payment of tuition charges. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

New Mexico

The Governing Board of New Mexico's public postsecondary institutions set resident and non-resident tuition and fees at their respective institutions. At the community colleges, resident and non-resident tuition and fees are set by the board of regents of the parent institution upon recommendation of the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education. The Commission is responsible for defining residency for the purpose of assessing tuition charges, and for "be[ing] concerned with the adequate financing of these institutions and with the equitable distribution of available funds among them." Based on the amount appropriated by the legislature from the lottery tuition fund and on the projected enrollment, the Commission determines the amount of money available for tuition scholarships at the state public postsecondary institutions and establishes the percentage of tuition awarded to all qualified resident students attending those institutions. In addition to the lottery tuition scholarships, the board of regents of each institution may grant scholarships in an amount not to exceed the matriculation fee or tuition and fees, or both. Each public postsecondary degree-granting institution in New Mexico must grant to persons over 65 years of age, upon request by the student, a reduction in tuition to 5 per credit hour. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

New York

As a coordinating board, the Office of Higher Education within New York's State Department of Education has no authority to set tuition and fees. Instead, the boards of trustees at each state postsecondary system sets tuition at the individual campuses. New York grants tuition awards to all eligible Vietnam, Persian Gulf, and Afghanistan veterans, and to eligible dependents of deceased correctional officers, who are enrolled in approved undergraduate or graduate programs at degree granting institutions or approved vocational training programs. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

North Carolina

The Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina fixes the tuition and fees at the institutions within its jurisdiction while being consistent with policies set forth by the General Assembly. The Board's general policy states, "The appropriate tuition policy at the undergraduate level encourages students to pursue academic and intellectual interests without regard to program costs. Accordingly, no difference in tuition between undergraduate programs will occur within an institution, and there will be only minimal differences in undergraduate tuition among campuses in similar institutional categories as defined by the Board to reflect both varying missions and contrasting costs of education." The Board of Governors is required to set tuition rates for nonresident students at levels "higher than the rates charged residents of North Carolina and comparable to the rates charged nonresident students by comparable public institutions nationwide." To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must have established legal residence in North Carolina and maintained that legal residence for at least 12 months immediately prior to matriculation. The State Board of Community Colleges establishes and regulates student tuition and fees that are consistent with policies for tuition and fees established by the General Assembly. Members of the armed forces and certain eligible teachers are charged in-state tuition only. In addition, North Carolina grants certain full or partial tuition waivers to individuals who are 65 years of age or older, spouses and dependents of law enforcement officers, firefighters, volunteer firefighters, or rescue squad workers who are permanently and totally disabled as a direct result of a traumatic injury sustained in the line of duty, and members of the North Carolina National Guard. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

North Dakota

The North Dakota State Board of Higher Education annually establishes resident and non-resident tuition and fees at the public postsecondary institutions. Residency is determined by graduation from a North Dakota high school, or by 12 consecutive months of living in North Dakota prior to matriculation. Tuition waivers are available for dependents of veterans, or of firefighters, emergency medical services personnel, or peace officers killed in the line of duty. In addition, individual institutions may adopt specific procedures providing for tuition and fee waivers. North Dakota policy states, "Institutions are encouraged to use this authority to promote enrollment of a culturally diverse student body, including members of Indian tribes and economically disadvantaged students, for the benefit of all students and the academic community, to promote enrollment of graduate students and research, and for other purposes consistent with an institution's mission." (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Ohio

The Ohio Board of Regents is a coordinating board and has no authority to set tuition and fees. Instead, the boards of trustees at each institution, whether state universities or community colleges, set their own resident and non-resident tuition and fee levels, with residency defined by state code. However, the Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents does have the authority to enter into reciprocal residential tuition agreements with neighboring states. Tuition is waived for veterans, and for spouses and dependents of public service officers killed in the line of duty. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Oklahoma

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education establishes undergraduate resident tuition, nonresident tuition, and mandatory fees. Each institution and constituent agency may recommend to the governing board and to the State Regents tuition and mandatory fees to be charged to students. At the comprehensive universities, the combined average of the resident tuition and mandatory fees must remain less than the combined average of the resident tuition and fees at the state-supported institutions of higher education that are members of the Big XII Conference. At the regional universities and two-year colleges, the combined average of the resident tuition and mandatory fees must remain less than the combined average of the resident tuition and mandatory fees at similar state-supported institutions of higher education that include, but is not limited to, states adjacent to Oklahoma as determined by the State Regents. Beginning with the 2008-2009 academic year, each institution within The Oklahoma State System of Higher Education is required to offer a guaranteed tuition rate to first-time, full-time resident undergraduate students for at least four consecutive academic years at the comprehensive and regional institutions and at least two consecutive years at the two-year institutions. Oklahoma grants tuition waivers to veterans, dependents of individuals who are prisoners of war or missing in action, and children of peace officers or firefighters killed in the line of duty. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Oregon

By statute, the Oregon University System (OUS), in accordance with the rules adopted by the State Board of Higher Education, prescribes student fees and charges. However, the OUS Board of Trustees has delegated to each institution's president the authority and responsibility to set resident and non-resident fees and charges. These fees are in addition to the required instruction fee, building fee, health service fee, incidental fee and other charges determined and established by the Board. Residency is determined by maintaining a predominant physical presence in Oregon for 12 consecutive months after moving to the state. The board of education of each community college prescribes and collects fees at the two-year institutions. Eligible armed services personnel and their spouses and dependent children are classified as residents for tuition purposes, as are members of federally recognized Native American tribes. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Pennsylvania

The Board of Governors of the State System of Higher Education fixes annual tuition rates for undergraduate and graduate students with a differential between resident and nonresident rates. Residency is defined as continuous residence in Pennsylvania for a period of 12 months prior to registration at a state public postsecondary institution. The authority to set and collect student activity fees rests with the president of each university in consultation with the student associations, within the limits imposed by the council of trustees and subject to the policies of the Board of Governors. The board of trustees at each community college sets tuition in accordance with the policies, standards, rules and regulations of the State Board of Education; tuition is determined by apportioning among the students enrolled in the college not more than one-third of its annual operating costs. State System of Higher Education policy states the tuition waivers are made available to eligible dependents of military personnel listed as missing in action or prisoners of war. In addition, each university, upon recommendation of the president and in accordance with board policy, may waive any or all fees for eligible state system employees, university employees and their dependents, foreign students, graduate assistants, medical technology students, retired individuals, students enrolled in a program funded through the Higher Education Opportunity Act, and students whose direct instructional costs are funded by a grant or contract. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Rhode Island

Each postsecondary institution sets its own tuition and fee levels. The Board of Governors must receive any tuition or fee increase schedules for the fiscal year for which state appropriations are made by the General Assembly. Rhode Island provides full tuition waivers to eligible veterans who have been disabled as a result of military service. The state also provides free tuition to Rhode Island National Guard members, as well as the spouses and dependents of National Guard members who are killed in the line of duty. Any Rhode Island resident who is 60 years of age or older whose household income is less than three times the federal poverty level as established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is also entitled to free tuition at any public postsecondary institution in the state. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

South Carolina

The boards of trustees at the individual four-year higher education institutions set tuition and fee levels. District school boards set tuition and fees for community colleges within their district. The Commission on Higher Education has established regulations for determining residency for tuition and fee purposes so that the institutions have fair and equitable regulations that can be administered consistently and are sensitive to the interests of both students and the state. South Carolina exempts members of the South Carolina National Guard from 50 percent of tuition charges, and provides various scholarship opportunities for residents through lottery funds. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

South Dakota

The South Dakota Board of Regents determines all resident and non-resident tuition rates, fees and room and board charges. The board uses the Consumer Price Index (CPI) calculated by the Bureau of Finance and Management as the inflationary measure that is used to gauge the annual inflation on the cost of higher education. Residency is determined by graduation from a South Dakota high school, 12 months of continuous residence in the state, or residency status of the student's parents. The Board has established a number of undergraduate non-resident reduced tuition programs for Adjacent States, Minnesota Reciprocity, and the Western Undergraduate Exchange Program. These rates are all close to 150 percent of the resident rate. South Dakota offers various partial or full tuition waivers, including but not limited to paying one-fourth of the cost of resident tuition for residents 65 years of age or older, paying 50 percent of the cost of tuition for members of the South Dakota National Guard, and paying full tuition for veterans, children and spouses of National Guardsmen who were disabled or deceased in the line of duty, and children of military personnel who died during service in the armed forces. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Tennessee

Tennessee has two higher education systems, one under the Board of Trustees of the University of Tennessee and one under the Board of Regents. The Higher Education Commission coordinates the two systems. The Board of Trustees of the University of Tennessee sets resident and non-resident tuition and fees at its campuses, and the Tennessee Board of Regents establishes resident and non-resident institutional and technology center fees at institutions under its jurisdiction. The two Boards approve changes in fees and charges annually at their respective annual meetings when the annual operating budgets are considered. The state provides tuition waivers to dependents of individuals classified as prisoners-of-war or who are deceased veterans, and partial tuition waivers to eligible children of public postsecondary system employees and full-time certified teachers in any public school in Tennessee. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Texas

The governing boards at each of the four-year public colleges and universities set resident tuition and fee levels within the limitations set by the Texas legislature. By January 1 of each year, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating board sets the non-resident tuition and fees at a level equal to the average of the nonresident undergraduate tuition charged to Texas residents in each of the five most populous states outside of Texas. Tuition at the public junior colleges (community colleges) is determined by the governing board of each institution. Tuition for resident students at these institutions may not be less than eight dollars for each semester credit hour and may not total less than 25 for a semester, while tuition for nonresident students may not be less than 200 for each semester. Higher education institutions may charge students higher tuition, not to exceed the rate of nonresident tuition, for excessive undergraduate hours. Eligible military personnel and their dependents are charged the same rates of tuition as Texas residents. The governing boards of each institution grant tuition and fee waivers to eligible veterans and their dependents, children of disabled firemen and peace officers, children of prisoners-of-war and those declared missing-in-action, eligible individuals who are at least 65 years of age for up to six credit hours per semester or term, and students in foster or other residential care. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Utah

The presidents of Utah institutions recommend resident and non-resident tuition and fee levels to the Utah Board of Regents for approval. Prior to adopting tuition increases, the Board must hold a public hearing during which it provides an explanation of the reasons for the proposed increase, an explanation of how the revenue generated by the increase will be used, and an opportunity for public comment from the students. Residency is determined by graduation from a Utah high school and/or 12 consecutive months of living in Utah prior to matriculation. The president of each institution may waive all or part of the tuition in behalf of "meritorious or impecunious" resident students to an amount not exceeding 10 percent of the total amount of tuition. Two and one-half percent of the waivers designated must be set aside for members of the Utah National Guard. In addition, institutions waive tuition for each eligible child and surviving spouse of Utah peace officers or firefighters who have been killed in the line of duty as well as individuals who are 62 years of age or older. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Vermont

The Board of Trustees of the University of Vermont has authority over the entire management and control of the property and affairs of the institution, including the establishment of resident and non-resident tuition and fee levels. The stated policy of the Board is "to provide greater educational opportunities for the youth of Vermont through reduced tuition charges at the University of Vermont and State Agricultural College." The amount of tuition for eligible Vermont residents must not be more than 40 percent of the tuition charged to nonresident students. Residency is determined by "reasonable durational domicile" requirements, as defined by the trustees of the University of Vermont and State Agricultural College. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Virginia

The Boards of Visitors of the four-year institutions fix, at their discretion, the rates charged to resident and non-resident students for tuition, fees and other necessary charges. The State Board for Community Colleges sets resident and non-resident tuition and fee levels for the two-year institutions. Residency is determined by a one-year domicile requirement in the state. Eligible members of the National Guard of the Commonwealth of Virginia are granted reduced tuition or tuition waivers. Tuition waivers are also granted to wards of the state, disabled veterans and their dependents, and qualified survivors and dependents of military service members killed in the line of duty or classified as missing in action or a prisoner of war. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Washington

Beginning with the 2003-2004 academic year and ending with the 2008-2009 academic year, reductions or increases in full-time tuition fees for resident undergraduates are as indicated in the omnibus appropriations act. Academic year tuition for full-time students at the state's institutions of higher education beginning with 2009-10, other than summer term, will be as charged during the 2008-09 academic year unless different rates are adopted by the legislature. The governing boards of the state universities, the regional universities, The Evergreen State College, and the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges may reduce or increase full-time tuition fees for all students other than resident undergraduates, including summer school students and students in other self-supporting degree programs. The governing boards or boards of trustees of the institutions set services and activities fees, but the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges sets the maximum student and activities fee levels at the two-year institutions. The governing boards or boards of trustees of the institutions also may waive all or part of the tuition, operating, and services and activities fees for veterans, persons 60 years of age or older, and for eligible dependents of citizens listed as missing in action or prisoners of war, Vietnam veterans, long-term unemployed or underemployed individuals, and state or school employees. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Washington D.C.

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area was created by private and public higher education institutions offering accredited baccalaureate and graduate degree programs in the Metropolitan Washington Area, but it has no authority over setting tuition and fee levels. The respective boards for each institution establish the associated resident and non-resident tuition and fee rates. The Consortium also works closely with the D.C. Tuition Assistance Grant Program to identify students eligible to receive a TAG grant. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

West Virginia

West Virginia's general tuition philosophy states, "Access to post-secondary training and education is a priority for West Virginia. A differential pricing policy for community colleges has been used effectively in many states to encourage broad participation, especially by adults and part-time students. The combination of lower costs for community college courses and a lesser share of education costs being assigned to students and parents should provide an adequate incentive for increasing enrollment in community colleges. Low tuition will not be sufficient. Adequate financial aid, especially for part-time students will be necessary if West Virginia is to meet its access goals." The individual governing boards of the institutions set resident and non-resident tuition rates and fees within guidelines and parameters established by the Higher Education Policy Commission (Board of Regents) or in West Virginia Code. The Commission reviews the institutional tuition and fee schedules for consistency with code. The institutional governing boards also may establish policies and procedures implementing various fee waivers. Tuition waivers may be granted to National Guard members, spouses and dependents of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty, wards of the state, veterans, and individuals 65 years of age or older. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Wisconsin

According to the University of Wisconsin System Regent Policy, "Tuition and financial aid in the UW System should balance educational quality, access, and ability to pay." The Board of Regents establishes rates of tuition and fees at the four-year public institutions. The Wisconsin Technical College System establishes tuition and fee levels at the community colleges. The district boards charge students the fees established by the state board and may establish and charge additional fees in accordance with state statute. The board permits eligible individuals who are 60 years of age or older to audit a course without paying an auditor's fee. The board also grants tuition and fee waivers to veterans and their dependents, and to the spouses and dependents of ambulance drivers, correctional officers, fire fighters, emergency medical services technicians or law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Wyoming

Wyoming's general tuition philosophy states, "To the end that none of the youth of the state who crave the benefits of higher education may be denied, and that all may be encouraged to avail themselves of the advantages offered by the university or community colleges, tuition shall be as nearly free as possible, and it shall be wholly free to either the university or any community college in the state, as elected by the student, to three (3) students annually from each county as are selected and appointed by the board of county commissioners therein." There is only one university in the state, the University of Wyoming, which sets its own tuition and fees. The Wyoming Community College Commission establishes tuition rates for the Community College System. The state pays the matriculation fees and tuition at any university, junior college, or vocational training institution in Wyoming for the children and spouse of any member of the Wyoming National Guard who has died or is permanently disabled as a result of service. The state pays tuition and required fees at the University of Wyoming or one of the seven community colleges for any member of the Wyoming National Guard to earn one degree. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)