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State Summaries

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID

Alabama

"The Alabama Commission on Higher Education administers various residency- and need-based aid programs funded by federal and state sources. The Student Grant program is a residency-based, tuition equalization program for students attending private, nonprofit colleges and universities, while the Student Assistance Program is the state's need-based grant. Also coordinated by the Commission are a minority doctoral program, out-of-state medical stipends, chiropractic scholarships, teacher technology training scholarships, National Guard grants, and aid for spouses and dependents of police officers and firefighters killed or disabled in the line of duty. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Alabama allocated 5,281 million for need-based aid and 2,347 million for non-need-based aid. In addition, the state has medical and dental scholarships (administered by the medical and dental scholarship boards, a pre-paid college tuition program (administered by the state treasurer's office), stipends for the dependents of veterans (administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs, and scholarships for students pursuing teaching certificated in math and science. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)"

Alaska

The Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE) administers a variety of federal, state, and need-based aid programs for Alaska residents and students attending eligible Alaskan institutions. The AlaskAdvantage Education Grant is a need-based program funded by the Alaska Student Loan Corporation, with emphasis placed on high-need students enrolled in qualifying workforce shortage fields of study. For the 2007-08 academic year, ACPE awarded just over 500,000 in need-based aid. ACPE additionally administered 720,000 in non-need based aid for participants in the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho regional medical education program (WWAMI). Through participation in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE), ACPE provides exchange program opportunities to Alaska residents, allowing 1,600 Alaska students to benefit from tuition savings in excess of 11.7 million in 2006, without forgoing their Alaska residency. The University of Alaska offers a college savings plan and need-based assistance programs, and also provides a four-year 11,000, merit-based scholarship to Alaska students attending qualifying high schools who graduate in the top ten percent of their class. The latter, the University of Alaska Scholar's Program, has awarded the scholarship to over 2,900 students since its 1999 inception. (Prepared by the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education, FY 2008)

Arizona

The Commission for Postsecondary Education administers several grant programs. The Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) program, funded through a federal-state partnership, provides financial assistance for students who have demonstrated need. Student Aid Trust Grants are awarded to underrepresented students with high financial need. Arizona has several subsidized and unsubsidized loan programs and a family college savings program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Arizona spent 2,808 million for need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Arkansas

"The Arkansas Department of Higher Education administers various merit, grant and loan programs. The state's merit programs include the Academic Challenge Scholarship, which combines financial need with academic achievement, and the Governor's Scholars Program. Arkansas has a Second Effort scholarship program to encourage students who did not finish high school to complete their GED and continue on to an Arkansas postsecondary school or college. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Arkansas appropriated 20,868 million for need-based aid and 10,945 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)"

California

The state of California only supports need-based aid. The Student Aid Commission is the state's principal provider of intersegmental statewide aid to postsecondary students and administers the state's four-tiered Cal Grant program and the Governor's Scholarship Programs. Cal Grant Program A is for both low- and middle-income students who meet the high school GPA requirement of 3.0. Cal Grant B is for low-income students and requires a high school GPA of 2.0; Cal Grant C is for students enrolled at career colleges, such as community colleges or vocational schools. Cal Grant T is a one-year award for students with a bachelor's degree who are working towards an initial teaching credential. In addition, California offers an Assumption Program of Loans for Education (APLE) for teachers at low-income schools and/or those who are teaching math, science or special education. This state also has a college saving trust (ScholarShare). For the 2005-2006 academic year, California awarded 758,181 million for need-based student aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Colorado

The Colorado Commission on Higher Education allocates state-funded financial aid to eligible public and private institutions. These allocations include need, merit and work funding. The need programs include the Governor's Opportunity Scholarship, the Colorado Student Grant for graduate and undergraduate students, the Colorado Leveraging Educational Assistance Program (CLEAP) and the Supplemental Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (SLEAP) programs which are state and federal partnerships. SLEAP is targeted to teacher education students. The merit programs include a graduate and undergraduate component and students must maintain at least a 3.0 G.P.A. to maintain their award. Seventy percent of the work study funded by the state must go to students who are need-based. The other thirty percent can be used without regard to need. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Colorado spent 55,116 million for need-based grants and 8,797 million for non-need-based. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Connecticut

Connecticut has no state-level agency to administer financial aid programs, but its institutions of higher education administer student financial aid from an array of sources such as the federal and state government, local banks and civic organizations. The state has several need-based programs, including the Capitol Scholarship, for students who demonstrate financial need and rank in the upper 20 percent of their high school class; the Connecticut Aid for Public Colleges, for students who demonstrate financial need; CONNTAC, for low-income individuals whose parents (mother or father) have not earned a Bachelor's degree and the Independent College Student Grant Program, for students with need who attend independent colleges and universities. The state has a grant program that includes loan reimbursement for minority students enrolled in teacher education programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Connecticut awarded 39,038 million for need-based aid and 343,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Delaware

The Delaware Higher Education Commission administers three need-based grant programs, several merit programs and incentive grant programs. The Scholarship Incentive Program is for full-time undergraduates and graduates, who have demonstrated substantial financial need, met the GPA requirement, and enrolled in degree programs in Delaware or Pennsylvania, or in certain circumstances, colleges outside of Delaware. Other grants include the Governor's Workforce Development Grant, which is a partnership between the Delaware business community, education institutions, citizens, and individuals employed in Delaware. Incentive programs target grants to increase the number of teachers, nurses, librarians, speech pathologists, optometrists, physicians and dentists in Delaware. This state also has a college savings plan (Delaware College Investment Plan) and several loan programs. For the 2005-06 academic year, Delaware spent 10,164 million for need-based student aid and 1,039 million for non-need-based student aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Florida

The Florida Office of Student Financial Assistance administers a variety of grant and loan programs that supplement aid available to Florida residents from federal, institutional, and private sources. For the 2005-06 academic year, Florida appropriated 107,849 million for need-based aid and 310,144 million for non-need-based aid. The state's primary need-based program is the Florida Student Assistance Grant. The primary merit-based program, the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship, requires a minimum GPA and SAT/ACT composite score. The William Boyd Florida Resident Access Grant provides non-need-based tuition assistance to Florida full-time resident students attending qualifying independent non-profit institutions in the state. The state provides a need and merit-based grant for students attending historically black colleges in Florida, and a scholarship program for students of Spanish, Latin or Mexican descent. There are also college savings plans available. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Georgia

Georgia does not allocate state funds for need-based aid. The Student Finance Commission administers various merit and need-based aids programs with funds provided by state, federal and private sources. The Georgia Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) grant is federally funded and designated for individuals with high financial need, whereas the Hope Scholarship is solely merit-based. In addition, this state has a tuition equalization grant, which provides non-repayable grant aid to residents who attend private colleges or to colleges out of state near the state's borders. Several service-cancelable loan programs are administered by the Georgia Student Finance Commission. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Georgia provided 1,401 million for need-based and 464,013 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Hawaii

"In addition to the Hawaii State Incentive Grant program, the State of Hawaii has a State Higher Education Loan Program that provides loans with terms similar to the Federal Perkins Loans. Most University of Hawaii campuses participate. This is a revolving fund program and no new funds have been allocated in recent years. Major Hawaii private institutions (Chaminade University and Hawaii Pacific University) participate in the SSIG. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Hawaii allocated 410,000 for need-based aid. The University of Hawaii system (all of public higher education in the state) has a broad ranging program of tuition and financial aid assistance in the form of full or partial tuition waivers for merit and/or service, scholarships funded from private sources, loans, and federal grant and loan programs, including scholarships administered by the office of Student Equity, Excellence and Diversity (SEED). Students also may receive financial assistance directly from various external organizations such as Kamehameha Schools and the HawaiI Community Foundation. The State Legislature passed a bill to create a College Savings program. The program was implemented a couple of years ago (HRS 256).(Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)"

Idaho

The Idaho State Board of Education administers various need and non-need based student aid programs. The state's Minority and "At- Risk Student Scholarship Program" is primarily need-based. Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) grants are available. Idaho has a promise scholarship program; the Idaho Governor's Challenge is another merit scholarship. This state has a grow-your-own teacher scholarship program and loan forgiveness program. Idaho has a non-resident tuition reciprocity program with Utah and Washington. The Idaho State Board of Education administers various need and non-need based student aid programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, the state appropriated 964,000 for need-based aid and 4,460 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Illinois

The Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC), via collegezone.com, serves as a one-stop financial aid center in Illinois, offering a comprehensive array of programs and services to students at every stage of the financial aid process. ISAC administers most of the key state and federal grant, scholarship, loan and pre-paid tuition programs available to postsecondary students in Illinois, including the need-based Monetary Award Program (MAP). ISAC also administers the Illinois Incentive for Access, a need-based program targeting additional aid to entering freshman with zero EFC (expected family contribution), and a variety of other student aid programs, including bonus and matching programs, that provide assistance to students based on academic performance, participation in the armed forces, intention to pursue a career in teaching, or other criteria. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Illinois awarded 355,417 million for need-based aid and 27,693 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Indiana

The Student Assistance Commission of Indiana administers several need-based and merit-based programs. The state has two grant programs, one of which is need-based. The Twenty-first Century Scholars Program is for 7th and 8th graders with substantial financial need and guarantees the cost of four years of college tuition for participants who fulfill a pledge of good citizenship to the state. In addition, the state has a need-based Higher Education Grant Program. Indiana has several loan plans scholarships and a college savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Indiana allocated 281,069 million for need-based aid and 5,915 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Iowa

The Iowa College Student Aid Commission administers various state and federal student aid programs. The Iowa Tuition Grant is for applicants with the greatest financial need. Moreover, the Iowa Grant is a need-based program that supports students attending public and independent colleges and universities, as well as community colleges in the state. Iowa's aid includes the merit-based Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship; the Robert D. Blue Scholarship, which awards students who demonstrate literary and scholastic ability and exhibit qualities of truth, courage, fellowship and strong moral character; the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation Scholarship for those students working towards a degree in an agricultural field; and the Iowa State Fair Scholarship, for students who participate in the Iowa State Fair. The Iowa College Student Aid Commission guarantees several student loan programs. In addition, this state has a Teacher Shortage Forgivable Loan Program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Iowa spent 53,446 million for need-based aid and 368,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Kansas

The Kansas Board of Regents administers various state and federally funded need- and merit-based student financial aid programs. The Comprehensive Grants Program provides financial support for residents who have demonstrated financial need and are enrolled in four year public and private colleges and universities in the state. One of the state's two scholarship programs designated for ethnic minorities blends both need and merit. The Kansas Ethnic Minority Scholarship assists financially needy, academically competitive students. The State Scholarship Program is designed to assist financially needy students in the top 20 to 40 percent of Kansas high school graduates. In addition, this state has a teacher service scholarship and an education savings program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Kansas provided 15,047 million for need-based aid and 121,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Kentucky

The Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) administers several state and federally funded need- and merit-based student financial aid programs. The primary need-based grant program is the College Access Program (CAP), which assists students enrolled in public and independent colleges and universities, proprietary schools, and technical colleges. The Kentucky Tuition Grant Program (KTG) provides need-based grants for residents to attend independent colleges in Kentucky. The Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) is a merit-based program that students earn while in high school. KHEAA also administers a need-based conversion loan program for students pursuing teacher certification, a need-based work-study program, and a need-based Go Higher Grant for adults attending college part-time. The state has a Savings Plan Trust, a prepaid tuition plan, and several loan programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Kentucky allocated 82,611 million for need-based aid and 90,255 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Louisiana

The Louisiana Board of Regents administers a variety of state and federally funded need- and federally funded need- and merit-based student financial aid programs. This state participates in the Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) Grant which provides need-based grants ranging from 200 to 2000 to academically qualified students. Louisiana offers merit-based scholarships, a need-based Go Grant program to support nontraditional and low to moderate-income students who need additional aid to afford the cost of attending college, and has a college savings program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Louisiana provided 1,453 million for need-based aid and 116,575 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Maine

The University of Maine System administers a variety of state and federally funded need-based and merit-based student financial aid programs. The Maine State Grant Program and Maine Black Bears Scholarship Fund provide targeted financial support for low-income students. In addition the Native American Waiver and Scholarship Program is need-based and provides for room and board as well as tuition and mandatory fee waivers. This state has several merit-based scholarships and a tuition savings plan, the Maine College Savings Program. Maine has several loan programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Maine spent 13,387 million for need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Maryland

The Maryland Higher Education Commission an extensive array of state financial aid programs that are classified in one of five categories: need-based, legislative, merit, career and occupational, and unique programs. These programs are designed to improve access to higher education for needy students; encourage students to major in areas of great economic need to the State, such as teaching and nursing; and encourage Maryland's brightest students to attend college in state. MHEC's largest need-based program is the Educational Excellence Award program, which has two components, the Guaranteed Access Grant and the Educational Assistance Grant. There is also a need-based program for part-time students and graduate and professional students. The career and occupational programs are designed to provide an incentive to students to work in specific career shortage areas. Most programs provide scholarships to students while enrolled in school, however the Loan Assistance Repayment Program assists individuals with paying off student loans. To be eligible, individuals must work for state, local, or nonprofit agencies, or as a primary care physician or a dentist assisting the medical assistance population. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Maryland allocated 78,125 million for need-based aid and 4,334 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Massachussetts

The Massachusetts Office of Student Financial Assistance administers numerous state and federal grant programs that are need-based and merit-based. One program of note is the Christian A. Herter Memorial Scholarship Program which grants scholarships to 10th and 11th graders who plan on attending college and exhibit extraordinary need. Massachusetts also has a tuition waiver program, a cash grant program and a general grant program, MASSGrant, all of which are need-based. In addition, this state has a no-interest loan program for Massachusetts residents. For the 2005-2006 academic year, this state awarded 80,081 million for need-based aid and 12,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Michigan

The Michigan Educational Opportunity Grant is available for students who have demonstrated financial need and are enrolled at least half-time at a Michigan public community college or university. In addition, an adult part-time grant is available for independent undergraduates with substantial financial need and who have been out of high school for two years. The Michigan Promise Scholarship provides up to 4,000 to high school graduates for successfully completing two years of postsecondary education beginning with the high school graduating class of 2007. This state has a two-phase tuition incentive program, which pays for the first two years of college and beyond for students who demonstrate financial need, are or have been Medicaid recipients, have graduated from high school or completed their GED before age 20 and as well as meet other eligibility guidelines. Phase I of the program will pay tuition and fees for students who complete 80 semester or 120 term credits leading to an associate's degree and phase II will pay tuition and fees up to 2,000 for credits earned in a four-year program at a Michigan university or college. This state has several loan programs and a tuition savings program. In the 2002-2003 academic year, For the 2005-2006 academic year, Michigan spent 90,377 million for need-based aid and 111,007 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Minnesota

The Office of Higher Education administers Minnesota's statewide financial aid programs. In 2005, financial aid totaling 1.86 billion helped Minnesota students and families pay for post secondary education. Minnesota has two small state-funded scholarship programs that are not based on financial need. In addition to the above programs for college students, the Minnesota State Grant help students from low- and moderate-income families pay for educational expenses at eligible Minnesota colleges or universities. Minnesota also offers scholarships for Native Americans, war orphans, and Veterans. The Minnesota College Savings Plan provides small matching grants for deposit in accounts established for Minnesota children from low- and moderate-income families. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Minnesota allocated 130,921 million for need-based aid and 89,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Mississippi

The Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning administers a variety of state and federal student financial aid programs that are merit-based and need-based. The Higher Education Legislative Plan (HELP) is both need- and merit-based and provides tuition and fees payment for up to ten semesters for Mississippi residents who meet eligibility requirements. Additionally, this state has a Leveraging Educational Partnerships (LEAP) program grant for students who demonstrate substantial financial need. The Mississippi Resident Tuition Assistance Grant (MTAG) provides a monetary award for tuition and is merit based. This state also offers the merit-based Mississippi Eminent Scholars Grant (MESG) and several specialized grant and loan programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Mississippi appropriated 2,215 million for need-based aid and 20,100 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Missouri

The Missouri Department of Higher Education administers a variety of merit and need-based aid programs provided by various federal, state, and privately funded sources. The Marguerite Ross Barnett Memorial Scholarship is the state's primary need-based aid program. The state's major merit-based program is the "Bright Flight" scholarship program. Another important financial aid program is the A+ Schools Program, which is administered by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. This program covers two-year college tuition and fee costs at designated public two-year institutions and area vocational technical schools for eligible students who graduate from A+ designated high schools. Lastly, the MOST Program is this state's tuition savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Missouri provided 25,632 million for need-based aid and 16,460 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Montana

The Montana Student Assistance Foundation administers a variety of state and federal student financial aid programs that are merit-based and need-based. The Governor's Postsecondary Scholarship Program offers both need-based and merit-based aid to residents. Montana also offers merit-based Community College Honor and Montana University System Honor scholarships. This state has a family education savings program, which is the 529 plan, and a guaranteed student loan program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Montana allocated 3,589 million for need-based aid and 171,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Nebraska

The Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education administers two grant programs - Access College Early Scholarship Program, which pays tuition and mandatory fees for qualified, low-income high school students to enroll in college courses from Nebraska's colleges or universities, and the need-based Nebraska State Grant. The student loan assistance program is operated by the Nebraska Educational Finance Authority and provides loans to private institutions to assist them in providing loans to their full-time students. Nebraska also offers a college savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Nebraska awarded 9,918 for need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Nevada

Nevada offers several state and federal student financial aid programs that are merit-based and need-based. The Nevada State Treasurer also administers the merit-based Nevada Millennium Scholarship Trust Fund which offers Nevada high school graduates free or reduced tuition to in-state universities and colleges. This state has a tuition savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Nevada spent 13,482 million on need-based aid and 28,471 million on non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

New Hampshire

The New Hampshire Postsecondary Education Commission administers a variety of merit and need-based aid programs provided by various federal, state and privately funded sources. The New Hampshire Incentive Program is the state's primary need-based program. The Leveraged Incentive Grant Program combines need and merit in providing assistance to students who are juniors and seniors enrolled in New Hampshire's accredited institutions. This state has a career incentive grant to encourage students to pursue careers in shortage areas. New Hampshire has several loan/scholarship programs, as well as a tuition savings plan and a College Bond Program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, New Hampshire appropriated 3,745 million on need-based aid and 8,000 on non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

New Jersey

The State of New Jersey offers various merit- and need-based aid programs provided by federal, state, and privately funded sources. The Educational Opportunity Fund grant assists low-income residents who are capable and motivated but lack adequate preparation for college study. For the 2005-2006 academic year, New Jersey spent 224,924 million for need-based aid and 32,507 million for non-need-based aid. New Jersey offers a college savings plan. The following programs directly benefit students while they prepare for college or assist them while in college: the College Bound Grant Program, providing academic support for low-income students in grades 6-12; the Special Needs Grant Program, providing direct assistance to students who are deaf or hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired, or students with learning disabilities as well as technical assistance to other colleges and universities in the state; the Education of Language Minority Students Grant Program, providing funds to develop or strengthen programs for ESL students who are residents of New Jersey. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

New Mexico

New Mexico's Commission on Higher Education oversees a variety of merit- and need-based aid provided by a variety of federal, state, and privately funded sources. The state's need-based grants are the Student Incentive Grant, the Student's Choice Grant, the Legislative Endowment Scholarship and the College Affordability Grant. In addition, this state has several merit scholarship programs, including the New Mexico Scholars and the Competitive Scholarship. This state has a tuition and college savings program and several loan programs, one of which is for teachers. For the 2005-2006 academic year, New Mexico allocated 21,781 million for need-based aid and 40,887 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

New York

New York's largest grant program is the Tuition Assistance Program, which is available to residents based on need. The NYS Educational Opportunity Program also provides assistance to financially disadvantaged, as well as academically disadvantaged. New York offers grants and scholarships for students who intend to teach in schools that serve low-income students and for students who will become math and science teachers. This state also offers a few scholarships for families of 911 victims. New York also has a college savings program and offers several loans. For the 2005-2006 academic year, New York provided 877,797 for need-based and 21,974 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

North Carolina

The State Education Assistance Authority administers various need-and non-need-based-based aid programs provided by federal, state, and privately funded sources. The state's need based grants include the UNC Need Based Grant (for student enrolling in one of the 16 campuses of the University of North Carolina); the NC Community College Grant & Loan Program (for student enrolling at North Carolina Community colleges); the State Contractual Scholarship Fund Program (for students enrolling in an independent non-profit institution in the state); and the North Carolina Student Incentive Grant (for students regardless of type of institution). In addition, North Carolina offers merit-based grants, additional need-based grants, and has a college savings program and several loan programs. For 2005-2006 academic year, North Carolina awarded 142,993 million for need-based aid, 53,831 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

North Dakota

The North Dakota State Board of Higher Education provides both need-based and merit-based programs for students. The North Dakota State Student Incentive Grant Program is this state's need-based grant for eligible residents. In addition, North Dakota has a few scholarship programs, one of which is for Native Americans. This state has several loan programs, including incentives for students interested in teaching or technical occupations, and provides tuition waivers for select students. For the 2005-2006 academic year, North Dakota allocated 1,492 for need-based aid and 371,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Ohio

The Ohio Board of Regents administers merit- and need-based student aid programs provided primarily by state sources. Ohio's need-based grants include the Ohio Instructional Grant, the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, and the Ohio Student Choice Grant Program, which is for students attending independent, non-profit colleges and universities. The Ohio Academic Scholarship is the state's merit-based program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Ohio spent 159,551 million for need-based aid and 61,860 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Oklahoma

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education administer merit and need-based student financial aid programs provided by federal, state and private sources. The Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP), also known as Oklahoma's Promise, is a unique need-based program for students who sign up in the eighth, ninth and tenth grades. Participants in the program must achieve a 2.5 grade point average by the time they graduate high school and the family's income must be 50,000 or less at the time of enrollment. This state has a few merit-based scholarships and a college savings program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Oklahoma appropriated 47,742 million for need-based aid and 10,607 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Oregon

The Oregon Student Assistance Commission (OSAC) administers a variety of federal, state, institutional and privately-funded student financial aid programs. A combination of merit and need-based programs are provided. Oregon's need-based state grant program, the Oregon Opportunity Grant, provides funds to eligible residents. Oregon also offers many other grants/scholarships through partnerships with private funds and public administration with its OSAC Scholarship Services. One program that is a result of a partnership is the ASPIRE Program (Access to Student assistance Programs In Reach of Everyone) which is designed to encourage students who do not see education beyond high school. For the 2005-2063 academic year, Oregon awarded 29,361 million for need-based aid and 68,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Pennsylvania

This state mainly allocates funds for need-based aid. The Pennsylvania Department of Education administers various state, federal, institutional and privately funded student aid programs. The PA State Grant Program is the state's need-based grant. In addition, The Path Program is a clearinghouse of participating community-based organizations, which leverage additional student aid for students with substantial need. The Pennsylvania Department of Education administers two merit-based scholarship programs, one of which is for two Historically Black Colleges. This state has a tuition savings program and a guaranteed college saving program, as well as several loan forgiveness programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Pennsylvania spent 412,340 million for need-based aid and 120,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island Higher Education Assistance Authority administers various state, federal, institutional and privately funded student aid programs. This state does not allocate funds for merit-based aid. Rhode Island awards the New CollegeBoundFund Academic Promise Scholarship to financially challenged and academically accomplished high school students. This scholarship is funded through proceeds coming to the Rhode Island Higher Education Assistance Authority from sales of the state's tuition savings plan. The Rhode Island State Grant is designed to provide grants to those students whose family resources are not sufficient to meet the costs of higher education. This state has a college savings program, CollegeBoundfund, and several student loan programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Rhode Island allocated 12,883 million for need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

South Carolina

The South Carolina Commission on Higher Education administers several need-based and merit-based student aid programs provided by various state, federal, and privately funded sources. This state has a variety of scholarship programs, all of which are merit based, and two need-based grant programs. The South Carolina Higher Education Tuition Grants Commission administers the need-based grants program for private colleges and universities as a part of the tuition grants program. In addition the financial aid office on each public college campus administers the Need-based Grants Program. The Access and Equity Undergraduate Scholars Program provides need-based grants, which are distributed by postsecondary institutions that provide dollar-for-dollar matching funds. South Carolina has a tuition prepayment plan and several loan programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, South Carolina appropriated 46,311 million for need-based aid and 211,173 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

South Dakota

The state of South Dakota administers the merit-based Opportunity Scholarship along with a scholarship program for American Indians and a college savings plan. This state does not provide funds for need-based aid, but allocated 3,367 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Tennessee

The Tennessee Higher Education Commission administers various merit and need-based student aid programs provided by federal, state and private sources. Tennessee has a need-based grant program, Tennessee Student Assistance Awards. This state has several merit-based scholarship programs, an educational savings plan and loan programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Tennessee awarded 51,270 million for need-based aid and 124,785 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Texas

"The Texas Coordinating Board for Higher Education administers various merit and need-based student aid programs provided by federal, state and private sources. Texas has several need-based grant programs. The tuition Equalization Grant Program provides grants for students with substantial financial need to attend private, non-profit colleges and universities in Texas. The Texas Public Educational Grant Program and the Toward Excellence, Access and Success (TEXAS) Grant Program are this state's primary need-based programs. This state has need-based tuition waiver programs, including one for citizens of Mexico residing in Mexico and attending certain Texas public universities. Another provides a nonresident tuition waiver for students from Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico and Oklahoma enrolled in Texas public colleges Texas has several forgivable loan programs and a tuition savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Texas spent 399,506 million for need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)"

Utah

The Utah Higher Education Assistance Authority (UHEAA) oversees a variety of merit and need-based student aid programs funded by federal, state and private sources. The Utah Centennial Opportunity Program for Education Grant is the state's need-based grant for residents. UHEAA is the Utah FFELP loan guarantor and operates a loan purchase program which provides substantial borrower benefits through reduced fees and repayment options. Utah has several merit-based scholarships, one of which is the New Century Scholarship Program. Under the auspices of the program, students who complete an associate degree by the time they graduate from high school are awarded the New Century Scholarship, which is up to 75% of the tuition for two years at any Utah institution of higher education offering a baccalaureate program. Utah has several loan programs. The Utah Educational Savings Plan Trust is the state's savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Utah allocated 6,604 million for need-based aid and 1,793 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Vermont

The Vermont Student Assistance Corporation oversees a variety of merit- and need-based student aid programs funded by federal, state, and private sources. The Vermont Incentive Grant is the primary need-based financial aid program. In addition, Vermont Part-Time Grants are need-based. This state has several merit -based scholarships and a tuition savings plan (Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan). For the 2005-2006 academic year, Vermont awarded 18,479 million for need-based aid and 101,000 for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Virginia

The Virginia State Council of Higher Education oversees a variety of merit and need-based student aid programs funded by federal, state and private sources. The College Scholarship Assistance Program and Commonwealth Award are state-wide need-based grants. In addition, the Virginia Guaranteed Assistance Program is a grant based on need and merit. This state also has several scholarship programs that are just merit-based. Virginia has a college savings program, a tuition assistance grant, and a loan program. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Virginia provided 90,458 million for need-based aid and 57,439 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Washington

The Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board administers a variety of student aid programs funded by federal, state, and private sources. Both the State Need Grant and the Educational Opportunity Grant assist needy or disadvantaged Washington residents. Another need-based program is the American Indian Endowed Scholarship, which is funded from private sources. The College Bound Scholarship is a four-year scholarship for low-income students who sign a pledge in 7th or 9th grade promising to graduate from high school. Washington has a college saving plan, as well as an advanced college tuition payment plan. This state has several loan programs. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Washington allocated 167,346 million for need-based aid and 6,497 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Washington D.C.

The D.C. College Access Program administers programs including the need-based Last Dollar Awards. Washington D.C. also has a tuition assistance grant and a college savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Washington D.C. spent 3,320 million for need-based aid and 30,536 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

West Virginia

The West Virginia Higher Education Commission administers various federal, state, institutional and privately-funded student financial aid programs. A combination of need and merit-based programs is provided for students. This state has a need-based grant program (HEAPS), for adult part-time students who have been out of high school for at least two years. In addition, the West Virginia Higher Education Grant Program provides monetary awards to students who demonstrate financial need. Several merit-based scholarship programs provide funds for students as well. The West Virginia Higher Education Commission administers the Promise Scholarship, the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program, the Underwood-Smith Teacher Scholarship Program and the Engineering, Science and Technology Scholarship Program. This state has a prepaid college savings plan. For the 2005-2006 academic year, West Virginia awarded 24,721 million for need-based aid and 46,524 million for non-need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)

Wisconsin

The State of Wisconsin Higher Education Aids Board administers various merit and need-based financial aid programs provided by state, federal, and privately funded sources This state has targeted need-based grants for the hearing and visually handicapped, as well as for Wisconsin residents who are 25 percent Native American. Moreover, Wisconsin has a minority undergraduate retention grant for students enrolled in independent or state technical colleges. The Talent Incentive Grant and the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant are both need-based grants awarded to Wisconsin residents with considerable financial need. This state has tuition reciprocity agreements with Michigan and Minnesota. Wisconsin has several targeted loan programs such as, the Minority Teacher Loan, Nursing Student Loan, Teacher Education Loan and Teacher of the Visually Impaired Loan. In addition, this state has academic excellence scholarships, which are merit-based. In the 2002-2003 academic year, Wisconsin is spending 65.356 million on need-based aid and 10.922 million on non-need based aid. (Reviewed by the University of Wisconsin System, FY 2008)

Wyoming

The State of Wyoming has a family college saving (529) program and administers several privately and federally funded scholarship and grant programs. This state does not itself provide funds for need-based or merit-based student aid although, in the case of the University, there are several statutorily-mandated merit scholarship programs that the University is obligated to fund. The Hathaway Scholarship Portal consists of four merit scholarships and one need-based scholarship provided as an incentive for Wyoming students to prepare for and pursue postsecondary education in Wyoming. For the 2005-2006 academic year, Wyoming provided 163,000 for need-based aid. (Prepared by the State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2008)